There are different techniques. One is based on freezing the corpse in liquid nitrogen, with equipment which completes this passage by distributing the substance through nozzles which spray the body which is stretched out on a metal platform. The result is a structure which is actually a somewhat fragile “frozen block.” At this point, the metal surface begins to move, making rapid jolts. The body “granitises,” we could say. The granulated material undergoes a process which eliminates all traces of humidity. This is a type of lyophilisation or freeze-drying. What remains is compacted, so that a tile around five centimetres in width is achieved. This tile can be buried at a depth of about twenty-five centimetres. After six months, the tile undergoes a normal decomposition...