Markets seek value, just like consumers. The problem is that different types of value are brought into opposition. For markets it is about economic value, whereas for consumers of a good it is about maximising the cost to use value ratio. At the beginning of the industrial era the dialectic between producer and consumer was: the former would supply a good that would last over time, in exchange for value. The mechanism jammed with mass industrialisation which, at the beginning of the 20th century, saturated the European economy’s richer and more appealing markets. At the time, certain sectors arrived at what economists define as “market saturation,” whereby the supply of a good is greater than its demand. This brings to a levelling of the growth curve of a market. Hence ...