In the past, a damaged object used to be mended. Clothes were patched, pots and working tools were repaired. End-of-life materials’ recycling was normal. The throwaway civilization, though, reduced such practices: an obsession for new models induced by advertisements and rapid technological evolution dictated an acceleration of objects’ replacement and an imposed reduction of their life span. Every year, Europe alone, eliminates 600 million tonnes of waste that could be recycled or reused.(1) This dominating trend is set against a new culture that, with difficulty, is successfully emerging and is based on a prolonged use of objects, on their sharing and end-of-life material recovery.  The package on the circular economy presented by the EU at the end of 2015, despite ...