The media is full of Chris Jordan’s famous pictures of seagull carcasses with their stomachs full of bottle caps, tubes and other plastic paraphernalia. Documentaries denouncing the indecent plastic pollution afflicting our planet, like A Plastic Ocean by Craig Leeson, have been watched by millions of viewers. Maps and data on islands of waste floating in the oceans are everywhere on social media, together with dramatic calls to get rid of microplastics from the oceans. The risk of finding considerable amounts of plastic in our stomachs, ingested via the fish we eat, is discussed during meals by people that are usually not that concerned with environmental issues. Oil is out of luck. After coming under fire for its contribution to greenhouse gas emissions it is now be...