The etymology of “garden” (gan) in Hebrew is the same as “to preserve” or “to protect” (le-hagen). The passage from Deuteronomy (20:19-20) forbids destroying fruit trees even during war or when sieging a city. The request (Numbers 35:2-5) of leaving a one-thousand-cubit-wide belt around a city where no houses or farming are allowed in order to improve “the beauty of the city” explains Ovadià da Bertinoro (Bertinoro, 1455 – Jerusalem, 1516). It is the request (Qohelet Rabbà) not to cause irreparable damage: “When the Almighty created Adam, he took him around the garden of Eden. He told him: ‘Look at my works, look how beautiful, how marvelous they are! I made them for you. Be careful not to strip or destroy my world, because if you do no one will be able to put it ...