Media is full of news and analyses on Brexit. All European households are talking about it, whereas politicians, investors, entrepreneurs and foreign citizens living in the United Kingdom (and vice versa) are spending sleepless nights dealing with it.  Why should therefore one focus – even only for a moment – on Brexit’s future impact on bioeconomy? The answer is quite simple: it is hard to find another area in technological research and development, innovation and future European transnational cooperation which could be more eloquent – and appropriate – to reflect the dire consequences of the decision made on 23rd June. As a matter of fact, the United Kingdom, its politicians, researchers and entrepreneurs have never appeared among the supporters of bioeconomy: th...